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‘No Water. No Life. No Blue. No Green’

No Water. No Life. No Blue. No Green” – Sylvia Earle

More than 2 million people are supposed to face water scarcity problem at present and in near future.

Around 700 million people in 43 countries suffer today from water scarcity and by 2025, 1.8 billion people will be living in countries or regions with absolute water scarcity.

Water scarcity is the lack of sufficient available water resources to meet the demands of water usage.

Two Mechanisms for water shortage; firstly low water content in a particular area causing demand of water to exceed far more than its supply-for the most part, dry parts of the world or arid regions are most often associated with physical scarcity.Water supplies being limited,risk from floods and droughts becomes high.

Secondly the lack of adequate infrastructure to store water resulting poor water management which is entirely a lack of compassion and good governance that allows the condition to persist.

Causes of water shortages include increase in population, climatic change due to global warming is expected to make some areas drier and others wetter, lack of proper sanitation channels creating water pollution and last but not the least due to competition of water resources.

Its natural that causes have consequences-effects of water scarcity include lack of suitable water for drinking and irrigation , water borne diseases, sanitation issues, causing countries to fight for this precious resources and ultimately a slow down in economy.

Water scarcity is both a natural and a human-made phenomenon. There is enough freshwater on the planet for seven billion people but it is distributed unevenly and too much of it is wasted, polluted and suitably managed. Interestingly, most developing countries in the world are not water-deficient — they’re infrastructure deficient.

Simply put, they have water but they don’t have ways to get or transport it.

We can take example of a developing country-Pakistan. There is a dire need to take action for water management, to build dams and reservoirs to save water.

According to the Indus River System Authority (IRSA) Pakistan’s major water reservoirs are at a dead level after 15 years. According to Pakistan Meteorological Department (PMD), the current level of water at Mangala Dam is 1,050 feet and its dead level is the same.

Similarly, Tarbela dam current water level and dead level is 1,386 feet, which is lowest since 2009.In a developing countries including Pakistan where population growth rate is high water is not less than a luxury.

In a metropolitan city like Karachi a good share of water is lost from the poorly managed water-supply network, and supply failures. What an irony it is to see a city by the water to die with “NO” water.

It simply takes some money, a bit of engineering and some local construction efforts. Some of the remedies that can be adopted are rain water harvesting, water conservation, water capping , strengthening pollution control boards and most importantly to educate people to use water with caution.

“A drop of water is worth more than a pot of gold to a thirsty man”

According to the World Bank, the percentage of the population in developing countries with affordable and adequate access to safe drinking water has remained virtually unchanged over three decades.

In fact, about one in five people in the developing world does not have access to safe drinking water.

Its development and management plays a vital role in agriculture production.Due to its multiple benefits and the problems created by its excesses, shortages and quality deterioration, water as a resource requires special attention.

Conclusion

Without question, water scarcity in an issue that must be addressed quickly and effectively.

Integrated water management is vital for poverty reduction, environmental sustenance and sustainable economic development.Individual countries and regions need to urgently tackle the critical problems presented by water stress.

“The real crisis is not oil, its water”

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Disclaimer: The views expressed in this article are solely of the author and do not represent ARY policies or opinion.